Books

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Some of you may know that I would love to start my own business. Well I'm in the process of doing just that. Just a little blip of redoing one of my courses and finishing my program. In the meantime I'm revving up the business plan, so I'm already in business by the time April 21st rolls around. Now don't get me wrong if Google comes calling or an amazing startup catches my eye, I'm there. I'm all about multiple sources of income. Not because of greed but because of job security in this precarious job market. Which brings me to this great book, #GIRLBOSS by Sophia Amoruso. She is the founder and CEO of Nasty Gal, a multi-million dollar online fashion retailer. And she did this under the age of 30. I won't be able to hit the under 30 mark, but I'm aiming for under 40. I'm always looking for inspiration in other entrepreneurs, women entrepreneurs in particular.

I wasn't sure if I liked the book in the beginning, particularly because of an early statement:

"I don't want you to look up #GIRLBOSS, because all that looking up can keep you down." Pg.13

I thought to myself, "What is the point, why should I even read this book, after a statement like that?" But I'm glad I did and I see her point. Sophia Amoruso talks about how her differences made her a success. How being the different kid who didn't fit in with her schoolmates, to not fitting in with certain jobs, that she held to pay the bills, made her who she is today. There are also exerts from her employees about what made them a fit for Sophia's company or not. What they brought to the table, and what makes them unique in their field. I relate in a lot of ways because I know that I don't fit in to what society deems acceptable, in many aspects of my life.

Takeaway? Differences can be good. It's all about how you channel them, and of course good old-fashioned hard work and perseverance.

#GIRLBOSS 4/5.

By the way I didn't look up #GIRLBOSS. I spent and am spending my time taking my business from a dream, to a reality.

Till next time,

Nadia

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*This review was not sponsored, all opinions are honest, true, and my own. Links are affiliate links.

Debut novel, Tell The Wolves I'm Home, by Carol Rifka Brunt, 2012. This was one of the first books that I picked up from the library, in months, and really enjoyed. In the past if I'm reading and not liking a book I'll struggle through to the end, just because I feel that I should give the author a fair chance. However, over the last year I no longer waste my time on a book that is not captivating. If it doesn't pull me in by chapter 2, I'm out. Tell The Wolves I'm Home pulled me in by page 4.

It's the 80's and HIV/AIDS is coming to the forefront of people's lives. Whether it's someone they know or in the news. June is a young girl with a pretty idyllic life. Parents who love each other, a sister, (grumpy and standoffish in a teenage way) and special relationship with her favourite and only uncle Finn. Until its discovered that Finn died from AIDS. We learn how her parents, her sister, and her late uncle's partner weave in and out of June's life. Along with secrets that were meant to be kept by many, pulling June out of her sheltered world into some of life's realities. There are plenty of adventures to keep you turning the page. Almost like a voyeur, in a non-sexual way, watching from around the corner. Some of the characters could be easy to hate, but Carol Rifka makes them likable, once you are able to delve into what makes them tick.

I'm really looking forward to Carol Rifka Brunt's next novel. She'll be on my list of favourite authors in the future.

I give Tell the Wolves I'm Home: A Novel by Carol Rifka Brunt 4 /5.

Till next time,

Nadia